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Winter Blues

 

Heater on and room warm- check

TV on ready to catch Hawthorn about to annihilate Geelong- check

Suitable beverages and snacks ready to keep hunger pangs at bay-check

Does this sound like your approach to winter activity? If so you are not alone. The European Journal of Physiology in 2009 reported that across many countries including Australia, and in all age groups from children to the elderly, that activity levels reduce in the winter months. There is world wide agreement that good health depends on us engaging  in sufficient physical activity to maintain fitness. Unfortunately in developed countries such as Australia, many fail to engage in enough exercise at any time of the year. So are we more likely to suffer more health issues in Winter due reduced exercise levels?…

Core-Energy

“Hey Doc. I’ve lost my core”. Spinal Stability explained.

Have you ever been told that you need to work on your “core” by a health professional or fitness instructor? Does your “core” just disappear because you didn’t know it was there in the first place or did you just misplace it one day?

So what does the term core stability mean? Like so many terms related to health, it has various meanings to different health professionals.  Some clients with back pain will roll their eyes when I suggest using an exercise approach to low back pain.” I’ve done it all before and it doesn’t work” they lament. …

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Preparing for the warmer weather

With the warmer spring weather comes the all the good intentions of spending quality time in the garden, keeping the weeds under control and manicuring the neatest lawn and edges in the whole street.  There is also the vision that by the time summer comes all of our friends and neighbours will be the beneficiaries of the most abundant supply of home grown vegetables imaginable.…

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Back to Sleep, Tummy to Play

Over the past few years there has been an increase in the number of babies diagnosed with the conditions: Plagiocephaly (mis-shapen head) and torticollois (crooked neck). One of the reasons associated with this is the reluctance of parents to place babies on their tummies.

The SIDs campaign has worked wonderfully at educating parents about the risks of a babies sleeping on their tummies but unfortunately this is often mistaken to means never placing baby on their tummies.…

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Prevention is better than a cure

Regular physical activity is essential to maintaining a healthy lifestyle, and central to the prevention, care and management of diabetes. Currently 70% of Australian adults and two thirds of Australian children are not getting sufficient amounts of exercise to maintain their health. This trend in physical inactivity is contributing to the increased prevalence of type 2 diabetes in our communities. Low levels of physical activity and physical fitness, along with poor nutrition, are major risk factors influencing development of type 2 diabetes.…

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Revisiting your New Year’s resolution

Just like that, we are nearly halfway through 2017. Did you set yourself a New Year’s resolution? Was it something along the lines of ‘I’m going to get fitter’ or ‘I’ll eat better’? The harsh reality is that more than half of us fail to meet our New Year’s resolutions.

Often clients come in and say “I want to get fitter”. This may seem like a really simple goal, but in actual fact it is broad, complex and non-specific.
What one person feels being ‘fit’ is may be something completely different to the next person. Whatever your perception is of fitness, the goal of ‘getting fitter’ often goes hand in hand with ‘eating better’.…

Article written by Healthfocus Physiotherapist Kellie Ladgrove. To book an appointment with Kellie Ladgrove, contact Healthfocus Physiotherapy .

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Step out in STEPtember

Did you know a healthy, active person should take 10,000 steps per day? That’s the equivalent of about eight kilometres or one hour of walking.

This month The Cerebral Palsy Alliance are holding Steptember.

TheCerebral Palsy Alliance is a not-for-profit organisation that assists people with Cerebral Palsy and their families to lead a comfortable, independent and inclusive life.

They also help fund research into better treatment options for people living with Cerebral Palsy.…

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Nature often needs a little extra support

A topic that is often under-discussed is the issue of ill-fitting bras, especially for larger breasted women.

For many Australian women an ill-fitting bra can be a source of pain, distress and embarrassment; the discomfort caused can stop these women being physically active, healthy and happy.

Breast support can be a sensitive issue, especially for younger or larger breasted women, but it is important to understand it and get it right, as much pain and discomfort can easily be prevented. …

Article written by Healthfocus Physiotherapist Julia Rossiter. To book an appointment with Julia Rossiter, contact Healthfocus Physiotherapy .

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Classes: find your fit

Group fitness classes are a great way to stay fit and healthy. They are a lot of fun and can be a nice way to meet people with similar interests and goals. There is a huge variety of classes so chances are there’s one that will suit you. There’s boxing, dance, spin classes, weight training, high intensity, yoga and Pilates. Just to name a few.

Stepping into a new class for the first time can be daunting. Some classes may require unfamiliar equipment or unfamiliar terminology (did the instructor just say down dog? What on earth is that?). Often classes are done to music. Keeping up with the pace of the music as well as trying to get your head around strange new moves can all be scary.…

Article written by Healthfocus Physiotherapist Kellie Ladgrove. To book an appointment with Kellie Ladgrove, contact Healthfocus Physiotherapy .

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The ‘wear and tear’ myth

After many years of treating injured tradies, I’ve noticed similarities between the language used when talking about machinery on the jobsite, and the body.

“Something’s out of place,” “Just a bit of wear and tear.”

These are common phrases a tradesman (or woman!) might use to describe their injury to me in the clinic. I’m not sure how this common comparison came about; perhaps through health professionals attempting to simplify matters, or through misrepresentation of the body and injuries in the media. Whatever the origins, two things are clear: firstly, this way of thinking is ingrained within the general population. Secondly, and most importantly, to think of the human body as a machine is not only not doing it justice, it is also completely inaccurate.…