Let’s Talk about Persistent Pain!

Busting myths, new ideas, management and recovery.

Recent changes to opioid medication availability have put persistent pain back into the spotlight. Poorly managed pain is a critical public health issue, particularly in rural and regional areas. We are fortunate enough to have some of the world’s leading pain science researchers right here in Australia, and our understanding of why things hurt and how to treat people with persistent pain has changed significantly over the past twenty years or so. It’s time to start applying this information in a clinical setting, and for health professionals to start working together to tackle persistent pain.…

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Physiotherapy: more than just a massage

When I tell people what I do for a living, I often get the response “physiotherapy, you must do a lot of massage”.

It’s fair to say that I do perform massage in my profession, however this is often a small and sometimes non-existent adjunct to my overall treatment.

In fact, physiotherapists have a wide range of skills and treatment options that aim to not just make you better, but rather work towards achieving your goals and living your life how you wish. …

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Boning up on breaks

Although the term “break a leg” is a lighthearted “good luck,” actually breaking a leg (or any other bone) is not much fun for anyone. Broken bones, or fractures, are usually the result of an unexpected incident such as a car accident, fall or sporting injury. The three most common bone fracture sites are the wrist, ankle and the hip. The six to eight week healing time often requires the affected area to be held in one position, usually with a cast. This can make everyday life difficult and stop us from doing the things that we love.…

Article written by Healthfocus Physiotherapist Kellie Ladgrove. To book an appointment with Kellie Ladgrove, contact Healthfocus Physiotherapy .


Hydrotherapy:heated and happy, year-round

Now that the cooler months have started to set in, the last thing many of us would be considering is a quick dip in the pool. However hydrotherapy continues on regardless of the outside temperature because it is always nice in the water. Hydrotherapy pools are normally heated to around 30-35˚C to generate maximum benefits.

Hydrotherapy is water based exercise normally supervised by a physiotherapist that takes place in a heated pool and can be used for a large number of conditions such as; chronic pain, fibromyalgia, arthritis like conditions, and as pre and post-surgical rehabilitation. Benefits of Hydrotherapy include: pain relief, strengthening of muscles, increased range of motion, improved balance and circulation.…


How to prevent the dreaded ACL injury

Three letters no-one wants to hear. ACL. It’s the injury no one wants, though it is all too common in many of the popular sports on the border.

The recovery is typically lengthy, and surgery is usually an option, especially for young people, and those keen on returning to competitive sport. The injury is more common in women than men, with an estimated two to eight times increased risk of injury.…


Rehab your way back to health

If you have an elective surgery planned, such as a hip or knee joint replacement, you are probably already familiar with the idea of rehabilitation.

You will spend the months after your surgery working on gaining strength and movement, working towards returning to work or activities you enjoy.

Rehab is an essential part of your recovery, but did you know that there is a lot you could be doing BEFORE your surgery that could help you maximise your outcomes?…